10 Big Mistakes New Authors Make

by Truitt Collyns


1. Limiting your marketing venues

With the rise of digital platforms most new authors know to take advantage of online social media marketing (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Breitbart), but most stop there. And in doing so, you prevent yourself from reaching so many key demographics: the elderly, Luddites, obese people with fingers too fat to type, the poor, convicts without access to electronics, people who never really considered owning a phone or computer, or even those who prefer spending time outdoors. But fortunately, there’s many other marketing avenues available even to the most inexperienced authors that will give your work the necessary exposure. Try, for example, taking a printed copy of your book to your local library and reading it loudly in a crowded area. If it’s a comedy, make sure to laugh boisterously at your own jokes, and if it’s horror, scream during the most intense sections. If time is not a factor for you, consider transcribing your first few chapters in chalk on the sidewalk, preferably in your town’s highest foot traffic areas. And if money is not a factor, skywriting is another option.

2. Writing for fun

Simply put, writing is a job, no different than being a doctor, plumber or general secretary of the United Nations. And just like those jobs, it’s a soul-crushing, mind-numbing endeavor that will make you question the purpose of your existence daily. And although if you have the talent and put in the hard work it’s likely to pay more than any of those jobs, it’s still not something anyone would consider fun. So if you’re going to quit your day job to write full time, make sure you’re doing it for the money and fame and not because you think it’ll be easier and more relaxing than teaching autistic children how to read.

3. Getting a professional book cover

You’ve all heard the maxim “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” It’s one of the first things they teach you in school. That’s right: Even little children know that you’ve got to look inside a book to know if it’s worth reading. Yet new authors will pay hundreds of dollars to graphic artists to design a book cover, when that money could be spent on more important things, like food stamps, alimony or insulin.

4. Forgetting to cultivate your image

Just like musicians and actors, authors aren’t really selling their books – they’re selling themselves. Experts say that after the title and the first chapter, the most important part of your book is the author photo. Readers want to relate to the people telling them stories. Do you think Stephen King would be nearly as popular as he is if he didn’t inspire people by showing them that even hideously ugly people could attain fame and fortune? And what’s more likely: that people like Dan Brown for his sharp blazer/sweater combos, or for his writing? And JK Rowling showed millions around the world that you could be a successful author and a woman.

5. Disregarding the competition

Most new authors feel their work can succeed on its own merits. They tell themselves that so long as my story is well-written and people can relate to it, I’ll have done my job. But real authors know how cutthroat this industry is. To get ahead, you’ve got to be willing to go on the offense. Let’s say I’m a prospective buyer and I’m looking for a new sci-fi adventure story. Am I just going to pick a book at random? More likely, I’ll choose work by an author who doesn’t support ISIS, or whose writing doesn’t “suck a bag of dongs.” People forget Robert Ludlum rose to prominence after publicly decrying Tom Clancy’s use of “underage orphan ghost writers.”

6. Forgetting to tell your publisher to get an IBSN

7. Putting page numbers in the middle of pages instead of at the bottom

8. Not paying tribute to any of the myriad satanic secret societies to which so many agents and editors at New York publishing houses belong

9. Using the “hunt and peck” method of typing.

10. Forgetting that agents and publicists are open to bribes, blackmail and extortion. 

Six Huge Changes Coming to the Publishing Industry in the Next Decade

by Qate Blanjett

book publishing

By the year 2028, scientists project more than half of the earth will be populated by people. Global warming will have escalated to the extent that the five largest corporations will be air conditioning manufacturers. The largest city on the planet will be Tokyo and the largest country will be Africa.

Taking into account current financial, academic and social trends, experts project the publishing industry is likely to see the following turbulent changes to its present platform.

1) Free book rental

Due to increasing unemployment in the Western world, millions will have a surplus of spare time but diminishing disposable income in comparison to previous eras. To resolve this problem, many governments will start subsidizing the publishing industry by purchasing large amounts of books, which will be stored at local facilities for open to the public. Readers can go to these places to not only peruse new and old titles, but also to rent books completely free of charge, provided they are returned within a predesignated period of time.

2) Mental link between authors and readers

In the next few years, we’re likely to see companies offer titles that can be downloaded directly to artificial memory chips already installed in a reader’s cerebral cortex, but by 2028, we’ll go a step further. Readers will simply visit their favorite author’s website and for a nominal fee, will be able to “mind-link” with the author and have the latest installment of their favorite saga telepathically transmitted to them. This will also benefit authors by saving countless hours of typing time.

3) The return of papyrus handscrolls

As we’ve seen in the past decade, despite the convenience and availability of emerging high-tech formats, many readers still prefer traditional forms of media. Therefore, we’re likely to see a 1400 percent increase in the amount of handscrolls sold, and the big publishing houses will devote at least 30 to 50 percent of their workforce to transcribing the latest best sellers on these scrolls.

4) Poorly written books will no longer be profitable

Places like Harvard and MIT are already at work on an algorithm that can tell whether a book is good or not. No longer will popularity and acclaim be subject to the whims of the literary critic or the Amazon reviewer. This algorithm will provide every single piece of literature in existence with an unbiased “value score” determining its literary merit. New novels – by debut self-published authors and firmly-established giants alike – that fail to reach a certain threshold will be removed from bookstores and likely deleted from existence.

5) Harper-Collins will buy a five percent stake in Penguin Random House

This will happen on July 18th, 2023.

6) Publisher and author dynamic likely to change

It’s very likely that, due to increase market pressure and a rise in the number of potential clients, established authors will be pressured heavily by publishers to produce work in a timely manner. In one possible scenario, a representative of the publishing company will inject a load of small nanobots into the author carrying a payload of strychnine in polymer sacs that, should she fail to meet a deadline, will be torn and released into the bloodstream causing instant paralysis and death.

47 Novels by Chinese-American Women You’ve Got to Read This Month

by Ding Yunyi
If you’re anything like me, you spend your whole day surrounded by books because you’re a research consultant for a publishing firm. But even if you’re not like me, you still probably get through a couple dozen books every month, which means you and I are not so different.
In this column, I’ll be writing about some great, recent novels worth checking out. Each entry will be categorized in some manner, sometimes by genre, sometimes by era, and in this case by the race, gender and attractiveness of the authors.

Best of the Best

Where Has the Time Gone?  by Daphni Jiang
A heartfelt drama about the childless marriage of two time-travelling vampires
The Women of the Chrysanthemum by June Wang
A young floral shop opener is haunted by spirits of the women who were turned into fertilizer and sold to her
How to Survive As A Woman in America by Zhou Ni Meng
One woman’s travelogue through American medical procedures and fitness culture
Behind Closed Eyes by Sasha Connie Chung
A woman discovers a terrible secret about her husband: he’s blind
Journey to the East by Chastity Ding Wo
A farcical comedy about two divorcees’ road trip from Tallahassee to Jacksonville
The Year of the Pig by Dawn Rae Chen
One woman’s quest to go an entire year only eating pork products
Touch of Silk by Chen Rui Dang
A coming-of-age story about a tensile strength evaluator in a Jiangxi textile factory
Riding the Red Dragon by Britney Speers
An erotic novel about a yoga teacher who has sex with dragons
Bootlegs and Knock Offs by Misty Stone
A love story about a big city girl with an affinity for stylish footwear and leaving work early
Fifty Years on the Great Wall by Michael Yu
A middle-aged literature professor called Humbert Humbert is obsessed with the 12-year-old Dolores Haze, with whom he becomes sexually involved after he becomes her stepfather

The Rest

Feminist Lit:

The Boy Next Door by Jackie Lin
The Good Women of China by Donna Evans
The Bad Women of China by Eve Adamson
The Sexy But Otherwise Mediocre Women of China by Fei Yi Mei
China Dolls (6) by Cao Xi Li
China Dolls (11) by Jessica Bangkok
Sense and Sensibility by Autumn Qiu
Harky Porter and the Philanthropist’s Stoat by Jing Kong Rao Ling
The Complete Works of Charlotte Bronte by Chao Xie
Short and Thick by Madeline Jiang
They Called Me Leprosy Face by Jane Qiong
All the Thick Girls by Li Li-Li
Mrs. Rick Shaw by Hai Lin
The Secret Life of a Short and Thick Girl by Lina Fei
Diaries of a High School Dropout (And North Korean Refugee) by Kim Kim
I Am China by Rui Zi Xuan
I Am Also China by Judy Xin
I Am Also China II: Escape to Delpulon by Judy Xin-Rui

Mystery, Suspense, Thriller:

Guangzhou Girl by Melissa Xu
Beijing Bitch by Melissa Xu
Shanghai Skank by Melissa Xu
The Filthy, Slutty Whore of Chongqing by Melissa Xu
Murder Beneath the Orient Express by Janet Chao
Journey to the Murder Beneath the Orient Express by Janet Chao
The House By the Geothermal Hot Spot by Bonnie Fo Fonnie
Green Tee by Ba Nana Fanna Fo Fonnie
I Have Diabetes by Wei Fu Bin Fee

Horror / Fantasy:

Children of Midnight by L’oreal
Zardoz by He Si Si

Z is for Zhizhisidi by Georgia Brown

The Wrong Side of Infinity by Lucy Li

Eat Shit and Die by Ching Chong

The Farmer’s Daughter by Stephanie Wu


The Party Leader’s Daughter by Stephanie Wu
The Speech Pathologist’s Daughter by Stephanie Wu
Dyscalculia by The Female Confucius